Wednesday, April 05, 2006

hhmmmm.....

The Franklin Coverup Scandal was the subject of Conspiracy of Silence, a 1994 Discovery Channel documentary that never aired, allegedly due to pressure from unknown members of Congress. Copies of the film have circulated around the internet. The documentary, produced by Britain's Yorkshire TV, was scheduled to have aired on May 3, 1994 - and appeared in TV Guide as such - but disappeared. [1] [2]
This complicated conspiracy theory began on June 29, 1989, when the front page of the Washington Times bore the headline "Homosexual Prostitution Inquiry ensnares VIPs with Reagan, Bush". The article, by Washington Times journalists Paul M. Rodriguez and George Archibald, broke the story that key officials of the Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush administrations were connected to an elaborate Washington, D.C male prostitution ring, and reported that two of these prostitutes even entered the White House late at night. The investigation also included, among other things, "abduction and use of minors for sexual perversion". [3]
Key persons named in the investigation were Craig J. Spence, a Washington lobbyist, and Lawrence "Larry" King, then manager of the Franklin Community Federal Credit Union in Nebraska. According to the December 15, 1989 New York Times, Nebraska State Senator Ernie Chambers came forward with reports of "boys and girls, some of them from foster homes, who had been transported around the country by airplane to provide sexual favors, for which they were rewarded." [4]
King — not to be confused with the talk show host — was one of the Republican party's rising stars, performing the national anthem at the 1984 and 1988 Republican Conventions. According to testimony of children rescued from the child prostitution ring, they were forced to have sex not only with King and other officials, but then-Vice-President Bush. This story was met with considerable skepticism, especially after some of the kids recanted their story. Others maintain that they were harassed and frightened into changing their story. [5] [6]
Former Nebraska State Senator John DeCamp wrote a book, The Franklin Coverup, and continues to research the subject today. Another investigator, Ted Gunderson, has been pursuing the case for years and has raised the idea that Jeff Gannon may be somehow connected to the Franklin scandal. Gannon is the pseudonym of James Guckert, a homosexual prostitute who caused a scandal in 2005 when it was learned he had gained access to the George W. Bush White House as part of the press corps. Gunderson proposes that Guckert is actually Johnny Gosch, a person who has been on the Missing Persons list since childhood. This view is not necessarily shared by the majority of researchers of the D.C. and Nebraska child prostitution rings, however, and has been called disinformation by some. [7]
On January 10, 1989, the Nebraska State legislature constituted a special committee to look into the allegations with State Senator Loran Schmit as Chairman. On January 30, 1990, Nebraska State Attorney General, Robert Spire, called for a grand jury to investigate allegations. February 6, 1990, former County District Judge Samuel Van Pelt was appointed a special prosecutor for the Douglas County Grand Jury, which convened on March 12, 1990. On July 23, 1990, after hearing many hours of testimony, the grand jury threw out all of the allegations concerning sexual child abuse and labeling the charges a "carefully crafted hoax".
In the Franklin Coverup Scandal of 1989, investigators of that case discovered that Paul Bonacci wrote in his diary that he had been flown into the Grove by republican leader Lawrence King and was forced into sexual acts with other boys including snuff films and BDSM.[1] Paul Bonacci later testified to these charges in court with U.S. Senior District Judge Warren K. Urbom presiding. Bonacci won the court case and was awarded $1 million by Judge Urbom.[2]

See the Hobbs Video Archive for more on the Bohemian Grove

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